Hood Boss Introduction to Your Kitchen Exhaust System

Hood Boss Introduction to Your Kitchen Exhaust System

Hood Boss has put together this introduction to your Kitchen Exhaust System. This video walks you through the different components that make up your Kitchen Exhaust System. It also walks you through the cleaning process and maintenance involved between services. As a courtesy we have thrown in a few trouble shooting tips for your exhaust fan if it stops working. We feel its important to educate yourself and your staff on how you vent hood works, how to trouble shoot issues with your system, and what to maintain between services. Please don’t hesitate to call us with any questions or concerns. Hood Boss would be happy to help provide information and/or give an in person orientation to your staff. Follow this link to learn more.

How to Light Your Equipment Pilot Lights

How to Light Your Equipment Pilot Lights

At Hood Boss we understand the revolving door that makes up the work force in the restaurant industry. With turnover in a facility comes lack of knowledge regarding how to use equipment. We came across this article that goes over step by step how to light pilot lights on different types of appliances.We wanted to share it with you to help provide resources to educate your staff. Hood Boss is always available to set up a time to provide an on site demonstration as well. Please let us know if there is anything we can do for you. Follow this link to learn more.

The Importance of a Kitchen Exhaust System Diagram

The Importance of a Kitchen Exhaust System Diagram


With the turnover rate in most restaurants today, having a kitchen exhaust system diagram on site is a must for restaurant owners. The diagram will allow the Kitchen Manager, General Manager, Maintenance Company, Fire Marshall, and Health Inspectors to have a clear cut understanding of the design of the system in order to be sure that the system is being maintained properly. A proper understanding of your kitchen exhaust system could prevent a fire in your facility and prevent potential risk of danger to your staff and guest. Below are a few questions that you can’t afford not to ask yourself. 

  • Do you know every bend and turn in your kitchen exhaust system?
  • Does your managing staff have the same understanding as you?
  • If not, how can you be sure that you are not at risk of fire?
  • What is the current condition of the exhaust duct between the hood canopy and the roof top?
  • How can you hold your current kitchen exhaust cleaning company accountable?
  • How can you be sure that your managers are properly performing a post cleaning inspection of service? 

If you answered no or do not have procedures in place for the proper understanding of your exhaust system, I would urge you to put one in place before it costs you thousands.

Hood Boss Vent Hood Diagram

Most Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning Companies will provide you with a professional drawing of your system upon request. The diagram should consist of a drawing of the system with the number and location of the access panels. The diagram should be on display so that your managing staff can refer back to it each time the cleaning service is performed at your facility. 

If Hood Boss can be of any assistance to you, please do not hesitate call 972-704-1812 or visit us online at www.thehoodboss.com . One of our team members would be happy to help direct you in how to get a diagram on display at your facility. 

Evaluating the Cause of Grease Build Up on Your Roof Top

Evaluating the Cause of Grease Build Up on Your Roof Top

There is a common misunderstanding between kitchen exhaust cleaning service providers and facility managers regarding grease build up on their roof tops. Most restaurant or Facility Managers feel that if there is grease on their roof top then there must be a deficiency in the work being performed by their service provider. Often this can be the case. However, there are some cases that grease can accumulate on your roof top in between services. There are three different ways that grease can accumulate on your roof top. It is important to be able to evaluate whether the service being performed is below par or if there is a need for preventative maintenance at your facility by knowing how grease accumulates and what to look for.  

 The first way that grease can accumulate on the roof top is through poor waste water management during the cleaning process. This is the easiest of the three to evaluate, though it does require follow up by the restaurant staff. During the cleaning process there are a few ways that grease can accumulate on the roof top. An example of poor waste water management is when a technician is spraying the bottom of the fan blades with the fan off the duct or when the fan is held open by the hinge kit. What typically can happen in this example is the technician sprays the bottom of the blades while allowing them to spin. By doing this, the blades spin and grease and water are slung out of the fan on to wall, roof top, A/C units, etc. This can cause multiple problems but typically can be detected easily. When evaluating your system to see if this is happening, you need to look for a spray pattern the size of the bowl of the exhaust fan. If this is occurring, grease will be accumulating in a concentrated area in the pattern of a “v.” The other way grease can accumulate is if the technician allows the waste water to run out of the exhaust fan and on to the roof top. This can be detected by evaluating how the grease is accumulating from the fan. If the grease is fairly light and extends down the roof toward the drain, then the grease accumulation was probably caused by poor waste water management. 

Grease Build up from Poor Waste Water Management

The second way grease can accumulate on the roof top is through grease leaking from the fan between services. This can happen for multiple reasons such as excessive rain between services, improper seals on the joints of the exhaust fan, and a bad seal between the fan base and the duct curb. When this happens, grease leaks from around the base of the exhaust fan, from the seams of the reservoir at the base of the exhaust fan, or from grease overflowing from the grease collection box mounted under the drain of the exhaust fan. All of these are fairly easy to detect. In most cases if you are getting grease accumulation between services, the grease will be accumulating in concentrated areas next to the fan. On roofs with a slight slope the grease can spread a little due to rain water. You will also be able to tell where the grease is leaking by looking at the side of the duct curb under the fan and at the grease collection box to look for drip marks where the grease has been leaking from. In this situation, we recommend to our customers that a preventative maintenance product be installed to protect against roof damage. There are many types of roof top containment products on the market, but your service provider should be able to walk you through your options and what works best for you. 

Grease Build Up on Roof top

The third way grease can accumulate on your roof top is through airborne particles. These can accumulate on the roof top due to the frequency of your system not being set properly. Typically when this happens grease is collecting in the base of the exhaust fan in a liquid state. Once the grease fills to a certain level, the air flow starts to sling the grease out of the fan reservoir and into the air causing grease to accumulate throughout the roof top in the form of small little drops of grease. At times, it can also accumulate in the form of a light film. If this begins to occur, you need to contact your service provider and discuss evaluating your frequency over the next several months to get it set properly where the problem will not continue. 

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Your roof top is a part of your facility and can get overlooked. Understanding how grease can accumulate on your roof top and the ways to evaluate how it is occurring can save you thousands of dollars in unnecessary repairs. If you are experiencing grease build up on your roof top you should contact your service provider and set up a time to look at the build with them. As we say at Hood Boss, “Expect what you Inspect.”

If we can be of any assistance to you please do not hesitate to call at 972-704-1812 or you can visit us at our website at www.thehoodboss.com.  

The Importance of a Hinge Kit on Your Kitchen Exhaust System

The Importance of a Hinge Kit on Your Kitchen Exhaust System

Although kitchen exhaust system fans are supposed to be supplied with a hinge kit when installed, we still see a lot of fans without them. Hinge Kits are an important part of the make up of an exhaust fan although it has become an item that is typically not enforced by the authority having jurisdiction in each area. In order to walk you through the importance of the hinge kit, I want to list the three main reasons that you need a hinge kit. Those reasons are listed below.

Code:
NFPA 96 8.1.1.1  States that “Approved up-blast fans with motors surrounded by the air stream shall be hinged, supplied with flexible weatherproof electrical cable and service hold-open retainers, and listed for this use.”

Material that the fan is made of:
The up-blast fan on your roof top is made up of spun aluminum. Spun aluminum is a very light weight and pliable material. To give an example of how pliable its is, you can take a pair of pliers and bend the frame.

Cleaning Process:
In order to clean your kitchen exhaust system to code, your exhaust cleaning company has to access the bottom of the blades of the exhaust fan and the vertical duct leading down to the hood in the kitchen. Most cleaning companies try and treat your equipment as if it was there own. However, if your system does not have a hinge kit installed, the technician has to maneuver a 125 plus pound fan off the duct curb that is covered in grease as well as water from the cleaning.

In summary, even with the best of intentions, there are variables that can cause damage to your exhaust fan during the kitchen exhaust cleaning process. Assuring that you have a hinge kit on your exhaust fan will help prevent damage to the fan molding due to normal wear and tear from the exhaust cleaning service, damage to the roof top, and allow your service provider to have the proper access to clean your system properly.

If we can be of any assistance to you please do not hesitate to call at 972-704-1812 or you can visit us at our website at www.thehoodboss.com.